DriveThruComics.com
Browse Categories







Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/20/2019 02:05:35

The return of Warhammer Fantasy Roleplaying Game to the hobby is something that I welcomed with a cheer, and I’m glad that Cubicle 7 did a fantastic job at bringing back the game. Not only did they restore the black comedy gold of the setting, but also introduced some mechanical streamlining that made it work better overall.

Sure there are some old mainstays, such as the incredible number of tables, but that’s part of the experience. Warhammer Fantasy always played well with people who enjoyed all sorts of risk-taking, and both good and bad things happen to player characters all the time.

Art and Layout

The art of the book is nothing less than stunning, and the layout is clean and readable without losing the feel of the game. Cubicle 7 has always excelled in this aspect, and they continue their winning streak here.

Language and Mechanics

The rules are on the middle to high range of mechanical difficulty, and will require a test game or two to really get into, but every rule here has a place. There are no odd mechanics that don’t reinforce the feel of the setting, and that’s something that I find very admirable.

Extra credit for having a book that knows how to best use language to push for the feel of a setting, then shifting to provide clarity in mechanics.

Conclusion

If you’re a fan of fantasy RPGs, you owe it to yourself to have this in your collection. The world and mechanics of Warhammer Fantasy RPG has a unique fingerprint in terms of both rules, setting and even feel that makes it stand out in the most crowded of fantasy worlds.

There’s a reason it’s lasted this long, and in the hands of Cubicle 7, this might be the best edition yet.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rulebook
by Lukas O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/12/2019 16:46:43

I was really hyped.

Now, that me and my friends finished our first 4e campaign, I must say: I think this project was rushed. Some rules are just vague or not included at all which leads to annoying but necessary discussions while playing which is unfortunate. Also the golden rule "change or ignore elements if you don't like it" is... Well you can't do it in terms of combat. Combat is some kind of gear mechanism and if you remove one thing (ADVANTAGE), the whole system is unplayable. In the end, we spent hours to homebrew a combat system we could enjoy (a bit) but this new "critical wounds" and insanely high critical hit rate with criticals even when defending and stuff is just overkill. While combat takes an eternity, you still have limited options what you can do during combat. Our experience was: you either Attack (opponent tries to dodge or parry) or you go defensive stance. That's about it. Sometimes you are able to do a charge attack and in really rare cases you can activate frenzy or something but... Yeah.

Tldr: This new combat approach feels very complicated. While it sounds great on paper, it feels like a burden while playing.

The overall quality is really good though. The art is nice but a little bit too repetetive. Even though this review sounds really negative so far, there are still many elements that I love about the 4th edition. Those are:

  • Dark deals (A really interesting and sometimes game changing mechanic)
  • the career system (it is easy to create homebrews and add missing stuff)
  • magic and everything that comes with magic (the lore specific effects are a great idea and work really well. There is a Lack of chaos magic though which is unfortunate)
  • height and it's effect on combat

Conclusion:

If you are a hardcore fan of the 2nd edition, you might hate this system. While all of the mechanics SOUND great, they didn't really convice me in the end. Me and my group played this version for about 6 months, had a blast but we can't wait to go back to our favorite edition of WFRP. All the best to Cubicle 7. Love you guys and I really want to love the 4th edition but I can't :(



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Soundtrack
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/10/2019 09:30:22

rating 11/5.5 not enough for $10. It should be released as free contents.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Soundtrack
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Buildings of the Reikland
by Benoit L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2019 14:18:58

Here is my review of this product!

For the price... it's an excellent buy. I'm going to use this product in my different fantasy games. I always find that most games tend to ommit floor plans from their line for unkown reason.

This book has 16 pages... I would have liked a book with more pages and more quality floor plans like the plans that are contained in this book.

We have Commercial Buildings (Herbert Harzert Cheesemonger of Distinction), a Warehouse, Dwellings (farmstead), Townhouse, Inns and Taverns... although it's all one of each, but that'S enough for start your imagination. We have a Municipal building (Canal Lock), Signal tower, Toll Gate. We have a Temple and a Wayside Shrine.

I think there should be more books like this, it helps me who has zero talents in drawing to create set pieces for my players in fantasy games. Right now I'm either in a Witcher game or other setting.

The drawings are great. The descriptions are great.

Need.

More.

Thanks! :)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Buildings of the Reikland
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Buildings of the Reikland
by Chad K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/27/2019 22:07:54

Three stars. Good products that could have been great with some more effort. 16 pages, but about 11 pages of real content. 11 buildings, 11 maps (appearance & floorplan), 11 descriptions, each has 2 or 3 adventure hooks of a few sentences. So art, a map, description , etc all on one page per location.

The good: Nice maps (floor plan & appearance) rooms are numbered and function listed some short adventure hooks

The bad too short not "exhaustively described" as advertised adventure hooks not fleshed out

Just too short. Could have been great with more content such as the personalities, adventure hooks detailed, room contents (loot), etc.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
WFRP Old World Adventures - Night of Blood
by Robert P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/19/2019 10:52:16

I thought clues are little too obvious in this adventure, but I like how it punish passive players.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
WFRP Old World Adventures - Night of Blood
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

The One Ring - Laughter of Dragons
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/13/2019 05:10:57

https://www.teilzeithelden.de/2019/05/06/rezension-the-one-ring-the-laughter-of-dragons-wider-der-zwietracht

Seit dem Tod des mächtigen Drachen Smaug gibt es ein starkes Bündnis zwischen den Königreichen Erebor und Dale. Dem Feind ist die Stärke der Freien Völker im Norden der Wilderlands ein Dorn im Auge. Deshalb schickt er einen seiner mächtigsten Diener, um Menschen und Zwerge in bitteren Zwist zu stürzen.

Zu den Quellenbücher des Mittelerde-Rollenspiels The One Ring bringt der Verlag Cubicle 7 in der Regel auch einen Abenteuerband heraus. The Laughter of Dragons baut auf Erebor auf, dem Ban dum das namensgebende Zwergenreich und das Königreich Dale (dt. Thal) am Fuße des Berges. Beide Reiche arbeiten eigentlich eng zusammen und sind sich in Freundschaft verbunden, doch der Feind fühlt sich von dieser Eintracht bedroht. Er schickt einen mächtigen Diener, um einen Keil zwischen beide zu treiben. Was dieser plant und was die Gefährten dagegen unternehmen können, das versprechen Klappentext und Einleitung zu zeigen.

Inhalt Zu Beginn steht eine Einleitung, in der die Abenteuer kurz vorgestellt werden. Diese können alleinstehend gespielt werden, sollen aber verbunden eine längere Handlung über die Pläne Feindes ergeben, quasi eine kurze Kampagne. Anders als beispielsweise Oaths of the Riddermark, dem Abenteuerband zu Rohan, haben die Abenteuer hier eine leichte Anknüpfung an eine andere Kampagne, The Darkening of Mirkwood, was aber nur Aufhänger ist. Es wird hauptsächlich bei der zeitlichen Einordnung berücksichtigt. Weitere Kenntnis der Kampagne ist daher nicht nötig.

An sich schön ist, dass ein paar wichtige NSC schon zu Beginn gelistet und erklärt werden. Das erleichtert die Einordnung, auch wenn es gut gewesen wäre, ebenso mit Seitenzahlen auf die passenden Stellen zu verweisen.

Die Abenteuer Ab hier folgen Spoiler, an zwei Stellen auch zu Tales from Wilderland und The Darkening of Mirkwood, weshalb nur potenzielle Spielleiter*innen diesen Teil lesen sollten.

Belanglos und unlogisch

The Silver Needle Während sie in The Silver Needle auf die Öffnung der Stadttore von Dale warten, werden die Gefährten Zeuge eines scheiternden Überfalls auf die alte Schneiderin Kelda. Schnell hören sie Gerüchte, dass der Räuberhauptmann Longo dahinterstecken soll. Der Hobbit Clovis weist ihnen die Richtung zu Longos Lager, doch das stellt sich als Hinterhalt heraus. Bei einem Überfall des Orks Radbal erfahren die Gefährten zufällig, dass Longo ein Hobbit ist… nämlich Clovis! Der hat mittlerweile Kelda eine magische Nähnadel stehlen lassen, die der Nazgûl Morlach, verdeckter Strippenzieher des Feindes, haben möchte. Die Gefährten haben gerade noch die Gelegenheit, Kelda vor einem Brandanschlag zu retten. Nun müssen sie Longo finden, der seinerseits von einer verfluchten Schwertscheide kontrolliert wird, und der Gerechtigkeit zuzuführen.

Dieses Abenteuer ist leider nicht gut geschrieben. Nicht nur, dass die Handlung irgendwie belanglos wirkt, vieles von dem, was passiert bzw. passieren soll, ist logisch nicht nachvollziehbar: Warum scheitert eigentlich der erste Überfall auf Kelda? Warum schickt Clovis/Longo die Gefährten überhaupt los, statt ihnen einfach konsequent aus dem Weg zu gehen? Warum fühlt sich der Ork Radbal von Longo betrogen? Er wusste doch schließlich, dass die Gefährten kommen! Generell ist die Aufdeckung der Identität sehr künstlich und erzwungen. Warum wird Keldas Haus erst angezündet, nachdem die Gefährten wieder in Dale sind, und nicht schon in der Nacht des Einbruchs? Auch fallen ein paar Ungenauigkeiten auf. Gerade wenn es darum geht, was wo liegt und wie lange Dinge dauern. Sehr negativ fällt die Begegnung mit dem Charakter Lord Hakon gegen Ende auf, der ebenfalls ein wiederkehrender Feind werden soll, hier aber mehr schlecht als recht eingeführt wird. Die Begegnung mit ihm widerspricht einfach vielen Regeln des guten Spielleitens. Longos verfluchte Schwertscheide ist des Weiteren derart übermächtig, dass er kaum überwunden werden kann.

Am schlimmsten ist aber, dass an keiner Stelle klar wird, was der Nazgûl eigentlich mit dieser Nähnadel will. Es bleibt nämlich letztlich eine Nähnadel!

Solider Investigativteil

Of Hammers and Anvils Auf ihrem Weg nach Dale finden die Gefährten den Zwerg Balin verletzt in einer Schlucht. Von ihm erfahren sie, dass er von Menschen überfallen wurde. Die Angreifer haben die Gefährten nur Momente vorher auf dem Fluss vorbeisegeln sehen. An nächsten Tag geht in Dale die Nachricht herum, dass Balin ermordet wurde, doch das stellt sich als Finte heraus, um seinen Feinden zu entkommen. Balin ist einer Verschwörung auf der Spur, die sich gegen Erebor richtet, und bittet die Gefährten um Hilfe bei der Aufklärung. Einige Untersuchungen ergeben, dass der verbitterte Zwergenschmied Niping im Hintergrund die Strippen zieht, um die Zwergengesellschaft nach seinen Vorstellungen zu formen. Bald schon werden die Gefährten von Lord Gunvar, einem von Nipings menschlichen Strohmännern, eingeladen, sich der Verschwörung und einer Sabotageaktion im Erebor anzuschließen. Wie sie jetzt handeln bestimmt, ob es in den Tiefen des Lonely Mountain zur Konfrontation kommt.

Ganz zu Beginn des Abenteuers steht ein klassischer Anfängerfehler: Der Fortgang wird von einem einzigen Würfelwurf abhängig gemacht! Nicht so toll. Später wird dafür oft nicht genannt, was für Würfe für offensichtliche Probleme notwendig sind.

Der Investigativteil ist durchaus solide, endet aber sehr gelenkt durch die Einladung von Lord Gunvar. Der verhält sich teils unlogisch. Denn wenn er sich wie beschrieben gut über die Gefährten informiert hat, sollte er eigentlich nicht so offen sein Blatt zeigen. Generell ist die Begegnung mit ihm etwas verwirrend beschrieben. Wieder kommt Lord Hakon vor, diesmal so verdeckt, dass man ihm nicht auf die Schliche kommen kann.

Insgesamt ist dieses Abenteuer von vielen handwerklichen Fehlern durchsetzt. Die Story um die Verschwörung hätte hier gut in Gang kommen können, wenn man verstehen würde, was eigentlich speziell mit dieser Aktion bezweckt werden sollte. Der Plan ist ein sehr offensichtliches Manöver und schadet den menschlichen Verschwörern eigentlich nur. Der Zwerg Niping taucht übrigens nie auf und man erfährt nirgendwo, was aus ihm geworden ist.

To Dungeons Deep In To Dungeons Deep beauftragt Lord Jofur die Gefährten, den zwergischen Gelehrten Domi zu finden. Dieser gab an, möglicherweise das vergessene Mausoleum des ältesten Sohns von Girion, den letzten König des alten Dale, gefunden zu haben. Zu einem geplanten Treffen mit König Bard ist er nie erschienen. Auch die Zwerge von Erebor wissen von diesem Mausoleum, und es kündigt sich jetzt schon an, dass es Streit um die Schätze dort geben wird. Nach einer anstrengenden Suche finden die Gefährten den alten Zwerg bei einer Gruppe Söldner und Orks, die ihn und seine Begleiter gezwungen haben, das Mausoleum freizulegen. Nach seiner Befreiung können sich die Gefährten davon überzeugen, dass die Gerüchte über die Schätze wahr und nicht übertrieben sind. Auf dem Rückweg werden sie in ein Lager der Bardinger und Zwerge geführt und müssen sich dort in den Streit darüber einmischen, wem die Fundstücke zustehen.

Dieses Abenteuer hat eine solide Handlung, die gut ausgearbeitet wurde. Erstmals ist hier wirklich verständlich, was aus welchem Grund vor sich geht, und der Plan des Feindes ist spürbar. Lord Hakon, der Diener Morlachs unter den Bardingern, kommt hier auch erstmal gut zur Geltung, ohne ihn zu enttarnen. In den vorangegangenen Abenteuern war seine Beteiligung eher mäßig eingefügt. Einziges Manko ist, dass nicht wirklich auf die Möglichkeit eingegangen wurde, Hinweise auf die Feinde im Hintergrund zu erlangen. Sowohl die Söldner als auch ein spektakulärer Angriff bieten eigentlich dazu Gelegenheit. Aber Befragungen oder ähnliches werden nicht einmal vorgeschlagen.

Gandalf höchstselbst taucht im Epilog kurz auf, aber leider auf eine Weise, wie gerade er es nicht sollte: Beliebig und uninspiriert.

In Sleeping Dragons Lie sendet König Dáin die Gefährten und andere Abenteurer mit keinem geringeren Auftrag aus, als einen Drachen zu erschlagen. Das Ganze soll allerdings möglichst unauffällig vonstattengehen, denn der König vermutet überall Spione des Drachen. Es ist eine beschwerliche Reise, auf der die Gefährten nicht nur gegen Orks und korrumpierte Konkurrenten kämpfen müssen, sondern vor allem die Landschaft selbst zum Feind haben. Wenn das alles überstanden ist, gilt es immer noch, einen leibhaftigen Drachen zu erschlagen!

Sleeping Dragons Lie Dieses Szenario kann genutzt werden, um an das Abenteuer The Watch on the Heath in Tales of the Wilderlands anzuschließen, indem man den Drachen Raenar wieder auftauchen lässt. Das Szenario nutzt eine abgewandelte Variante der Regeln für das Eye of Mordor aus dem Quellenband Rivendell. Ich bin persönlich kein Freund dieser Regel, aber hier ist das ganze zumindest halbwegs ins Szenario eingebunden. Denn letztlich wird darüber bestimmt, wie mächtig der Drache ist, wenn die Helden ihm gegenübertreten. Leider ist der Hintergrund dieses Mächtiger-werdens nicht ganz ersichtlich. Die Reise zum Ziel ist wirklich strapaziös für die Gefährten. Schöner wäre es allerdings gewesen, hätte es mehr gut ausgearbeitete Hindernisse gegeben, statt vieler Hazards. Die werden nämlich in der Regel mit ein oder zwei Würfen aufgelöst. Der Drache selbst ist dann wahrscheinlich ein brutaler Gegner!

Schwach hingegen sind die konkurrierenden Drachenjäger, die ich allesamt nicht überzeugend eingebunden finde, obwohl sie Potenzial hätten. Entweder fallen sie durch merkwürdige Motivationen oder seltsames Verhalten auf. Auch fällt auf, dass das Szenario eigentlich gar nicht in die Hintergrundhandlung des Bandes eingebunden ist.

Dark Waters Dark Waters beginnt mit dem Verschwinden des Schmieds Orsmid, der an einer prestigeträchtigen Statue König Bards in Laketown gearbeitet hat. Nachforschungen auf Bitten seiner Schülerin enthüllen schon bald eine alte Feindschaft, die sich um einen kostbaren schwarzen Edelstein dreht. Letztlich führt die Untersuchung die Gefährten über Umwege unter die Plattformen von Lake-town, wo Orsmid von einer Gruppe krimineller Waldelben gefangen gehalten wird, und zusätzlich eine schreckliche Bestie lauert.

Wenn der letzte Satz irritiert, ist das zu Recht. Was eine spannende Geschichte um die Schuld aus vergangenen Zeiten und zerbrochene Freundschaften zu sein scheint, wird gegen Ende mit einer zweiten Thematik verknüpft (kriminelle Waldelben, die Mud-men), die nicht nur mehr als gekünstelt und fehl am Platz wirkt, sondern auch mit dem Rest nichts zu tun hat. Dabei ist der vorangegangene Investigativteil schön gestaltet und hat viele Hinweise. Aber der Twist gibt dann leider nichts her, die alte Feindschaft zwischen Orsmid und dem Händler Odvarr, die eine Vergangenheit als Diebe teilen, wird kaum aufgegriffen, und das Monster, das Guttermaw, ist nur um seiner selbst willen eingefügt.

Mit der Prämisse des Bandes hat auch dieses Szenario wieder nichts zu tun.

Shadows in the North Ein weiteres Mal ist es Balin, der die Gefährten in Shadows in the North um Hilfe bittet. Sie sollen eine Orkarmee auskundschaften, die sich nicht allzu weit weg sammelt. Es stellt sich jedoch heraus, dass dies nur eine Täuschung und Falle des Nazgûls ist, der den Arkenstone stehlen will. Bei ihrer Rückkehr nach Dale werden nicht nur die Gefährten, sondern auch Balin festgenommen. Der verräterische Lord Hakon hat einen Prozess angeleiert, um die lästigen Gefährten endgültig aus dem Verkehr zu ziehen. Ob sie dem durch Wortgewandtheit oder Flucht entgehen, ihr Weg wird sie zum Erebor führen. Dort müssen sie durch eine waghalsige Flucht durch den Einsamen Berg den Arkenstone retten, denn die Ringgeister selbst sind gekommen, um ihn sich zu holen.

Hier sollen alle Fäden der bisherigen Abenteuer zusammenführen… nur: Was sollen das für Fäden sein? Die Pläne des Feindes waren in den vorherigen Abenteuern nicht besonders beeindruckend, und selbst die wurden ja wahrscheinlich von den Gefährten vereitelt. Daher ist die angespannte Stimmung, von der im Abenteuer gesprochen wird, nicht so recht glaubhaft. Ebenfalls nicht verständlich ist, warum die Nazgûl den Arkenstone nicht von Anfang an versucht haben zu stehlen. Probleme in den Erebor einzudringen scheinen sie keine zu haben! Störend ist auch die plumpe Enthüllung dieses Plans durch einen Gegner, der einfach die Klappe nicht halten kann. Leider ist auch der Prozess insofern eher uninteressant, da keine Möglichkeit vorgesehen ist, wirklich etwas zu bewirken (z.B. Lord Hakon zu enttarnen). Selbst im besten Fall führt einen das Szenario letztlich an die gleiche Stelle. Dafür ist die Flucht durch den Erebor definitiv die beste Szene im ganzen Band, spannend und abwechslungsreich gestaltet. Nett ist auch, dass sich zumindest bemüht wurde, möglichst viele interessante NSC aus den vorangegangenen Abenteuern einzubauen.

Gandalf taucht in diesem Szenario auf, was tatsächlich auch passend wirkt. Unschön ist nur eine Hilfe nach der Art deus ex machina. König Bard taucht hier erstmals in persona auf, verhält sich aber erst desinteressiert, nur um gegen Ende doch etwas zu machen. Seine Passivität wurde den ganzen Band damit gerechtfertigt, dass die Abenteuer kurz nach dem Tod seiner geliebten Königin in The Darkening of Mirkwood spielen. Das hätte man aber bis zum Ende durchhalten sollen.

Wie bei Niping erfährt man übrigens nicht Lord Hakons endgültiges Schicksal, sondern wird auf später vertröstet.

Der Anhang Im Anhang finden sich die Werte und Regeln für die Verwendung der Ringgeister. Das ist gut, da man so nicht The Darkening of Mirkwood als Referenzwerk braucht.

Erscheinungsbild Auch diese Publikation für The One Ring hält den hohen Standard an die Optik aufrecht. Gute Illustrationen unterstreichen die beschriebenen Situationen. Vor allem gibt es aber wieder tolle Portraits von NSC, die glaubwürdige Menschen und Zwerge darstellen.

Text ist wie üblich zweispaltig und lässt sich gut lesen. Textwüsten gibt es keine, da Überschriften, Textkästen und Illustrationen immer wieder für Auflockerung sorgen. Im PDF laden die Seiten zügig, wenn man das Zoom nicht zu groß einstellt.

Bonus/Downloadcontent

Die Karten, leider ohne Beschriftung der Schauplätze. In der PDF-Version sind die Karten, die sich normalerweise im Einband befinden, gesondert als PDF beigefügt. Leider wurde versäumt, auch Orte aus den Abenteuern einzutragen.

Fazit Leider fällt der Gesamteindruck zu The Laughter of Dragons schlecht aus. Zunächst verfehlt der Band es, das zu erzählen, was er versprochen hat. Von subtilen Plänen des Feindes bekommt man nicht viel mit. Das, was er letztlich versucht, ist entweder undurchdacht oder eher Holzhammermethode. Löbliche Ausnahme ist nur To Dungeons Deep. Zwei Abenteuer haben gleich gar nichts mit der Grundhandlung zu tun.

Noch schwerer fällt allerdings ins Gewicht, dass die Abenteuer insgesamt nicht besonders gut sind. Nur zwei, wieder To Dungeons Deep und Sleeping Dragons Lie, würde ich als solide bezeichnen, der Rest ist mäßig oder schlechter. Aber keines hat beim Lesen wirklich Lust gemacht, es zu spielen!

Woran aber liegt das? Zum einen daran, dass es keine starken NSC gibt. Viele sind zwar nett gemacht, aber gerade unter den Gegnern ist keiner, der in Erinnerung bleiben wird. Wie auch, wenn man nie erfährt, dass sie hinter etwas stecken?

Die Handlungen der Szenarios sind oft nicht gut konstruiert, haben merkwürdige Wendungen oder wirken uninspiriert. Handwerkliche Fehler sind auch öfters zu finden.

Insgesamt ist von diesem Band abzuraten, gerade für seinen hohen Preis. Schade, dass hier so viel Potenzial für eine Kurzkampagne vor dem spannenden Setting Erebor und Dale vergeben wurde.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Laughter of Dragons
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Wrath & Glory - Grundregeln (PDF) als Download kaufen
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/08/2019 09:17:54

https://www.teilzeithelden.de/2019/04/09/rezension-wrath-glory-ulisses-spiele-einmal-alles-mit-bolter/

Lang stand die Zukunft des Warhammer 40k-Rollenspiels in den Sternen. Doch dank Ulisses North America gab es bereits letztes Jahr ein neues System für das beliebte Setting. Nun ist die deutsche Übersetzung erschienen. Wir haben den Bolter durchgeladen und uns in die finstere Zukunft gestürzt.

Denkt man an Grimdark-Fantasy, ist der Gedankensprung zu Warhammer nicht weit. Mit Dark Heresy, grauenhaft ins deutsche mit Schattenjäger übersetzt, erschien 2008 unter der Ägide von Black Industries ein sehr beliebtes Rollenspielsystem für Jünger des Warhammer 40.000-Universums. Später von Fantasy Flight Games publiziert, baute sich das System eine ordentliche Fangemeinde mit diversen Erweiterungen auf. Nachdem Games Workshop die Lizenzen neu verteilt hatte, sollte Ulisses North America ein neues System entwickeln, welches dann auch Ende letzten Jahres auf Englisch erschien. Nun liegt die deutsche Übersetzung vor, nach der sich viele sehnten.

Die Spielwelt Warhammer 40.000 ist genau genommen inzwischen im 42. Jahrtausend angekommen, und das Universum ist immer noch im Krieg. Wer mit der aktuellen Warhammer-Zeitleiste vertraut ist, kann diesen Teil vermutlich überspringen, spielt Wrath & Glory doch parallel zu aktuellen Geschehnissen.

Was bisher geschah… Ein vollständiger Überblick über die Geschehnisse der letzten rund 40.000 Jahre würde vermutlich jeglichen Rahmen sprengen und Dimensionen wie eine Abhandlung über die Dune-Saga erfordern. Daher soll hier nur auf das Nötigste eingegangen werden, um (noch) Unkundigen einen groben Überblick zu verschaffen.

Seit Jahrtausenden besiedelt die Menschheit den Weltraum, hat sich auf unzähligen Planeten niedergelassen und beherrscht große Teile des bekannten Universums. Kontrolliert wird alles, zumindest in der Theorie, vom allmächtigen Terra, der guten alten Erde. Dort herrscht formell der Imperator, der jedoch seit einer tödlichen Verwundung an eine sehr spezielle Maschine, den goldenen Thron, gefesselt und eher tot als lebendig ist. Dies übrigens seit rund 10.000 Jahren. In der Praxis kämpfen viele Institutionen um die Kontrolle des Imperiums, und die Verwaltung ist so mit sich selbst beschäftigt, dass viele Planeten und Systeme von autokratischen Gouverneuren regiert werden.

Als wäre das nicht schon fordernd genug, treiben sich noch allerlei fiese Gestalten im Universum umher, die ebenfalls um die Vorherrschaft ringen. Darunter sind die verschiedensten Spezies mit ihren Besonderheiten. Von Weltraum-Orks über Weltraum-Elfen (Aeldari) und Weltraum-Terminatoren zu Starship Troopers’schen Bugs ist so ziemlich alles dabei. Auch gottähnliche Wesen mischen in diesem bunten Reigen mit. Vier davon bilden auch den bedeutendsten Antagonisten der Menschheit: Die Chaosgötter. Diese stammen aus einer Art Paralleldimension, dem Warp, und versuchen, sich das Universum, und speziell die Menschheit, untertan zu machen. Dazu setzen sie gleichermaßen auf Dämonen wie auf Paktierer und Kulte. Zwei Sachen sind dabei übrigens ziemlich blöd für die Menschen: Will man interstellar schnell vorankommen, muss man durch den Warp reisen, und wenn man psionische Fähigkeiten einsetzen möchte, muss man dafür auch auf den Warp zurückgreifen.

Betrachtet man die aktuelle Situation der Galaxie, hatte beinahe das letzte Stündchen der Menschheit geschlagen. Truppen des Chaos, angeführt vom abtrünnigen Space Marine Abaddon, standen mit Dämonen auf Terra. Zuvor war es ihnen gelungen, das Imperium durch einen Warpriss zu teilen, was es natürlich deutlich schwächte. Zum Glück für die Menschheit kehrte aber ein verloren geglaubter Held zurück: Roboute Guilliman, Primarch (Primarchen sind oberste Kommandanten und genetische Väter jeder Legion und stammen alle widerum vom Imperator selbst ab) des Space Marine-Ordens der Ultramarines, warf, mit der mehr oder minder geheimen Unterstützung einiger eigentlich verhasster Aeldari und eines genial wahnsinnigen Techpriesters, das Chaos zurück.

Nach einem kurzen Plausch mit seinem Vater, der wenn überhaupt telepathisch kommunizieren kann, erklärte er sich zum Stellvertreter des Imperators und obersten Feldherrn. Änderte ein paar Spielregeln im Imperium, stockte die Space Marine-Orden um eine Weiterentwicklung der traditionellen Space Marines auf (sogenannte Primaris Marines: Größer, schneller, besser…), versammelte eine fast schon obszön große Flotte und Armee um sich und trieb das Chaos weit zurück. Doch langsam sind die Kräfte des großen Kreuzzuges aufgebraucht und die imperialen Truppen versuchen, überall kleine und große Angriffe des Erzfeindes zurückzuschlagen. Währenddessen reiben sich natürlich die zahlreichen weiteren Feinde des Imperiums die Hände.

…nur Krieg Das sind natürlich die besten Voraussetzungen, sich in Abenteuer zu stürzen, die den Intellekt und Kraft gleichermaßen fordern, denn natürlich bietet die Menschheit einiges zu ihrer Verteidigung auf. Neben ganz regulären menschlichen Soldaten der Imperialen Armee am Boden und in wirklich großen Raumschiffen (Besatzungen unter 1.000 Mann, Frau und Mutant sind eher selten), gibt es noch viele Institutionen. Die vier vermutlich bedeutendsten und bekanntesten stellen wir hier kurz vor.

Die Space Marines dürften mit die bekanntesten Vertreter sein. Genetisch hochgezüchtete Kriegsmaschinen, mit einem IQ, der Hawking vor Neid erblassen ließe, einer Körperkraft, die Captain America beeindrucken würde und einer Rüstung, gegen die Iron Man wie Spielzeug wirkt. Diese speziellen Krieger sind wohl die härteste Faust, die das Imperium gegen seine Feinde aufbieten kann.

Die Inquisition steht, wie die Space Marines, außerhalb der klassischen imperialen Hierarchie und ist direkt dem Imperator unterstellt (Der ja nicht so wirklich in der Lage ist, klare Anweisungen zu geben). Drei große Orden widmen sich dabei der Verfolgung von Dämonen, aller nichtmenschlichen Wesen und Psionikern, die nicht unter der Kontrolle des Imperiums stehen.

Das Ministorum ist die mächtige Staatskirche des Imperiums und unterhält viele bewaffnete Arme. Interessant ist hier, dass der Imperator zu Lebzeiten Religion ablehnte und eher als Atheist galt. Eine traurige Ironie, dass er nun verehrt wird.

Das Adeptus Mechanicus des Mars hat die Kontrolle über sämtliche Technologie. Denn in den zahlreichen Kriegen ist soviel Wissen verloren gegangen, dass viele Technik gar nicht mehr richtig verstanden wird. Die Schaffung und Wartung technischer Geräte gleicht auch mehr einem kultischen Vorgang als nüchterner Ingenieurskunst.

Dazu gesellen sich viele weitere Organisationen, wie das Adeptus Arbites, eine Art FBI und S.W.A.T. des Imperiums, Hexenjäger, Freihändler und viele mehr.

Ein besonderes Schmankerl hält das System für Freunde cyberpunkesker Settings bereit: Mit Gangern aus Necromunda kann man auch als Krimineller die Unterstadt einer riesigen Makropole unsicher machen.

Was spiel ich nur… In dieser Situation finden sich die Spieler nun wieder. War bei Dark Heresy und seinen Ablegern noch ganz klar vorgegeben, welche Institution man spielt, bleibt hier die Qual der Wahl.

Einer der großen Vorteile von Wrath & Glory ist die Offenheit, mit der man diese große Welt erkundet. Mit Regeln für Aeldari und Orks ist es sogar möglich, reine Xenos-Gruppen zu spielen oder, sofern sinnvoll, auch gemischt.

So können kampflastige Spielgruppen eher einer Ork-Warband, einem Space Marine-Trupp oder einer imperialen Elite-Einheit gewogen sein, während detektivisch begeisterte Runden wohl zur Inquisition tendieren werden. Wer eher auf piratische Abenteuer steht und auch gerne Xenos mit Menschen mischt, wird sich als Freihändler wohlfühlen. Mit festen Archetypen versehen sind jedenfalls die Imperiale Armee, Space Marines, Inquisition, Adeptus Mechanicus, Ministorum, Adepta Sororitas (Orden aus Kampf-Schwestern), Chaos-Anhänger, Freihändler, Orks und Aledari.

Wenn auch nicht explizit vorgesehen, bieten sich aber mit minimalen Anpassungen und etwas Hintergrundrecherche natürlich noch weitere Konstellationen an. Wie wäre zum Beispiel ein recht bodenständiger Trupp Arbitratoren, der Verbrechen aufklärt, oder eine Einheit des Logos, die für Guilliman verlorenes (und verbotenes) Wissen sammelt?

Die Regeln Wie beim Ulisses-System HeXXen 1733 dürfen W6 die meiste Würfelarbeit leisten. Gewöhnlich reichen dabei 3 Erfolge auf eine 4+. In Zweierschritten gibt es dann -2 bis +8 eine Erleichterung bzw. Erschwernis.

Gewürfelt werden die Proben auf passende Fertigkeiten, deren Werte um einen Attributwert ergänzt werden und damit den Würfelpool bilden. Bei Proben wird, in der Regel, ein Würfel aus dem Pool als Zorn-Würfel deklariert. Würfelt man mit diesem eine 6, erhält man einen Ruhmespunkt, den man als Gruppenentscheidung zu seinem Vorteil nutzen kann. Bei einer 1 folgt eine Komplikation.

Das System begünstigt eindeutig harte und schnelle Kämpfe. Relevant für den Kampf sind dabei Nahkampf-Wert (Kampfgeschick und Initiative) und Fernkampf-Wert (Gewandtheit und ballistische Fähigkeit), der Verteidigungs-Wert, der Schadenswert der Waffe, sowie der Schock-Wert und die Anzahl von Wunden.

Dazu kommen noch reichlich Spezialfähigkeiten, die sich auch nach Charakterstereotyp bzw. Klasse unterscheiden, und Psi-Kräfte. Letztere können auch zu Komplikationen führen, da der Einsatz von Warp-Kräften nicht ungefährlich ist. Von einem unheimlichen Nebel bis zur Manifestation eines Dämons im Psioniker ist alles möglich.

Ebenfalls gibt es umfangreiche Regeln für Ausrüstung und Fahrzeuge, inklusive Regeln für Boden- und Raumkampf.

Relevant ist bei vielen Fähigkeiten und Ausrüstungen auch das sogenannte Fraktionswort. Spielerinnen und Spielern des Tabletop dürfte dieses vertraut sein. Jeder Charakter bekommt mehrere dieser Worte bei seiner Erschaffung zugewiesen, Fähigkeiten, die dann nicht eines oder die Kombination aus mehreren Worten enthalten, sind dann für diesen Charakter nicht erlernbar. So kann ein imperialer Psioniker zum Beispiel alle Psi-Fähigkeiten erlenen, die das Wort Psioniker oder Imperium beinhalten, aber nicht jene, bei denen Orks, Aeldari oder Chaos steht. So bekommt man schnell einen Überblick, was erlernbar ist oder nicht.

Die Charaktererschaffung beginnt hier tatsächlich sehr weit vorne. Zunächst sollte man sich auf ein Gruppenkonzept verständigen, was angesichts der Vielfalt nicht immer leichtfallen dürfte. Danach einigt man sich auf die sogenannte Machtstufe. Diese dient der Spielleiterin oder dem Spielleiter als Referenzpunkt für die kommenden Abenteuer. Diese regelt dabei, mit wieviel Erfahrung und Ressourcen ein Charakter startet und wie seine Fähigkeiten und Ressourcen limitiert sind. Theoretisch ist es möglich, die Machtstufe während der Kampagne zu verändern. Charaktere sollten hauptsächlich in dieser Machtstufe sein und maximal um eine Stufe differieren. Somit verhindert man, dass ein Charakter innerhalb einer Gruppe zu schnell über- oder unterfordert ist. Nun folgen Spezies in Form von Menschen, Space Marines, Aeldari und Orks. Dabei werden leider nur die loyalen Space Marine-Orden beschrieben, obwohl das Regelwerk durchaus Chaos Marines vorsieht. Hier darf man eine der sicher kommenden Erweiterungen vermuten.

Hat man Konzept, Machtstufe und Spezies bestimmt, darf man nun aus 31 Archetypen wählen, denen, neben diversen Fähigkeiten und Machstufen, auch Schlüsselworte zugeordnet sind, wie man sie aus dem Tabletop kennt. Diese Schlüsselworte nehmen unter anderem Einfluss auf die Charakterentwicklung, die Gruppenzusammensetzung oder auch gewisse Fähigkeiten.

Wurde gewählt, vergibt man nun, unter Berücksichtigung gewisser Vorgaben aus Spezies und Archetyp, seine Charakterpunkte für Attribute, Fertigkeiten und Talente, die einem mit Vorteilen ausstatten.

Psioniker dürfen nun noch, je nach Machtstufe, aus einem bunten Strauß Psikräften wählen. Ob Telepathie, Telekinese, Pyromantie oder Prophezeiungen, hier ist für jeden Spielstil etwas dabei.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht 486 Seiten lassen fast keine Frage eines Spielleiters oder einer Spielleiterin unbeantwortet. Charakterregeln, Psiregeln, Waffen, Ausrüstung, Spezies, Bestiarium und wichtige Fahrzeuge sind ordentlich sortiert und dadurch gut zu finden. Bei so einem Regelwerk lässt sich gelegentliches Blättern nicht verhindern. Standardsituationen in Kampf und Ermittlung dürften aber schnell genug in Fleisch und Blut übergehen, dass man nur noch in speziellen Situationen nachschlagen muss.

26 Seiten des Grundregelwerks widmen sich Fragen der Abenteuergestaltung. Dabei bekommen auch SL-Einsteiger wertvolle Tipps zur Konzeption erster Abenteuer. Fragen zur Umwelt, Distanzen, Ermittlungen oder dem Warp werden ausführlich beantwortet. Dazu kommen 45 Seiten Einführung in die Welt, samt schöner Kurzgeschichte Aaron Dembski-Bowdens, die einen guten Eindruck der Spielwelt vermittelt.

Beispiele für Waffen in Wrath & Glory Xeno-Waffen in Wrath & Glory Damit dürften auch Einsteiger in die Welt des 42. Jahrtausends gut zurechtkommen und spannende Abenteuer erschaffen können. Wer noch offene Fragen hat, wird in diversen Warhammer-Wikis schnell fündig oder kann sich für ein Weltgefühl auch den ein oder anderen Roman zu Gemüte führen. Für die aktuelle Zeitlinie hilfreich und gut zu lesen sind unter anderem Das dunkle Imperium und Die Legion des Imperators: Wächter des Throns. Wer einen Einblick in die Inquisition haben möchte, dem kann man zu Die Schattenchronik von Terra: Der Leichenthron oder den Büchern um Inquisitor Gregor Eisenhorn raten.

Ein kleines Ärgernis bleibt jedoch beim Studium des Grundregelwerkes. So wird einmal davon geschrieben, dass Spielerinnen und Spielern mit einer sogenannten Kampagnenkarte, die erzählerische Aspekte ergänzen soll, starten. Im späteren Verlauf wird zudem der Eindruck erweckt, dass Zornkarten zum Abhandeln von bedrohlichen Aufgaben genutzt werden sollen. Liest man jedoch in der Einleitung, was zum Spielen benötigt wird, ist von diesen Karten keine Rede. Vermutlich soll beides als optional gelten, da diese Karten, wie viele andere Karten, zum Beispiel zu Ausrüstung und Talenten, extra zu erwerben sind. Ganz klar wird das jedoch nicht, und gerade unerfahrene Gruppen könnten den Eindruck bekommen, diese Karten seien zwingend erforderlich. Hier könnte in Errata nochmal nachgebessert werden, wie das nun tatsächlich zu verstehen ist.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht Das System erlaubt Spielerinnen und Spielern eine immense Vielfalt, verglichen mit Dark Heresy, aber auch anderen Regelwerken. Dabei ist man eher erschlagen als eingeschränkt. Die 31 Archetypen des Systems lassen viel Freiraum, um eine Gruppe aus echten Individuen zu schaffen. Jedem Charakter wird dabei zusätzlich, wenn gewünscht, eine Charaktermotivation mitgegeben. Dies hilft natürlich enorm beim Einstieg. Spielerinnen und Spielern, die nicht mit der Spielwelt vertraut sind, ist jedoch die Lektüre der Einführung empfohlen, diese erleichtert deutlich, sich in dieser komplexen Welt zurechtzufinden.

Ein großer Vorteil sind dabei sicher die Machtstufen als Hilfsmittel, vor allem für Leitende. Der einfache Soldat oder frische Inquisitionsagent hat nicht die Tiefe an Wissen über diese Welt wie der abgebrühte Inquisitor. Dies kann eine Spielleiterin oder -leiter schön in das Spiel einbinden, um ihrer Gruppe nicht nur den Einstieg zu erleichtern, sondern auch für viele Überraschungen zu sorgen. So vermeidet man auch die Überforderung, die so eine vielschichtige Spielwelt mit sich bringen kann.

Spielbericht Die Charaktererschaffung geht recht flott von der Hand. Es hilft natürlich, wenn jedes Gruppenmitglied zumindest die Erschaffungsregeln zur Hand hat. Aber einen Abend wird man einplanen müssen.

Einen Spieltest haben wir bereits im Rahmen des Quickstarters durchgeführt. Hier fehlten zwar die Psiregeln und Fahrzeuge, aber er gibt dennoch einen guten ersten Eindruck. Je nach Gruppenschwerpunkt wird man mehr mit Ermittlungen bzw. sozialem Spiel oder Kampf zubringen. Proben gehen dabei recht fix von der Hand, wobei die alte W100-Systematik einen Tick eingänglicher ist. Kämpfe kann man sowohl recht fließend und dynamisch darstellen oder auch enorm taktisch, was dann eher an klassische rundenbasierte Strategiespiele erinnert.

Erscheinungsbild Das Layout ist übersichtlich und in der von Ulisses gewohnten hohen Qualität. Manchmal sind nur die Textumbrüche etwas störend für den Lesefluss. Die Illustrationen sind im Vergleich zu ersten Artworks sehr gelungen. Sie geben detailreich sowohl Archetypen als auch typische Szenen aus den Büchern und dem Tabletop wieder und sind in der Qualität mit denen der Tabletop-Regelwerke zu vergleichen. Der Index am Ende dürfte etwas umfangreicher sein, das Wichtigste findet man damit aber recht fix. Mit seinen fast 500 Seiten hält man einen ordentlichen Wälzer in der Hand, der haptisch zu überzeugen weiß.

Bonus/Downloadcontent Ulisses North America bietet auf seiner Homepage sowohl einen editierbaren Charakterbogen als auch Regel-Errata kostenfrei an. Auf Deutsch ist beides zum Zeitpunkt der Rezension noch nicht verfügbar.

Fazit Mit Wrath & Glory legt Ulisses ein 40k-Rollenspiel vor, das in seiner Vielfalt kaum zu überbieten ist. Wer schon in Dark Heresy die Möglichkeit schätzte, aus einer Vielfalt an Archetypen zu wählen, wird hier sehr glücklich werden, insbesondere mit der Möglichkeit, auch Xenos zu spielen. Was andere erst mit Erweiterungen herausbringen, liegt hier schon vor, und man dürfte allein mit den Grundregeln schon eine ganze Weile spielen können, zumal die ganze Gruppe ja in Machtstufen aufsteigen kann. Dark Heresy hatte dafür ein Ergänzungsregelwerk, hier geht das von Haus aus.

Das System selbst ist an manchen Stellen etwas würfellastig, das liegt aber auch im Ermessen der Gruppe, wie sehr sie das ausreizt. Prinzipiell gibt das System aber auch einen stark narrativen Ansatz, grade über die Machtstufen, her.

Wer auf finsteren Space-Gothic steht oder sowieso dem Universum immerwährenden Kriegs verfallen ist, sollte hier beherzt zugreifen, dann man bekommt für sein Geld ein opulentes Werk.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory - Grundregeln (PDF) als Download kaufen
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition - Middenheim: City of Chaos
by alberto d. j. D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/02/2019 20:24:35

more old school wfrp goodness, so much to pick and choose to launch any capaigm from, can't wait to see more of the old school library. #THANKYOU !



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay First Edition - Middenheim: City of Chaos
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

WFRP - Adventures Afoot in the Reikland
by Xorn X. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/02/2019 16:35:38

A very good product. It consists "only" of nine pages (not counting the first two pages, which consist of artwork), so do not expect to get a whole campaign book. But those nine pages consist of five or six adventure ideas per page (one paragraph each); so you will get approximately fifty well formulated ideas for adventures to work with. Layout and artwork are very good as well. You will not find any stats for monsters or opponents, so this little booklet should be useful for anybody who plays medieval-style rpgs.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
WFRP - Adventures Afoot in the Reikland
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rough Nights and Hard Days
by Ryan T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/27/2019 18:35:30

This would have been worth the price for just the storyline, but the inclusion of a whole playable species and a section on some fun and interestingly designed pub games makes it practically indispensible.

The actual storyline is, in a lot of ways, a welcome change of pace from chaos cults and the supernatural as the central focus, as has perhaps been overdone in WFRP over the editions. Having a sort of constantly escalating frenetic energy to the plots more at home in old British comedy series feels like it should keep things moving and interesting, and the layout of events happening on an ordered timetable is extremely welcome for running the campaign, as well as the quality and utility of the maps.

There's a sense of well thought out worlbuilding and flavour to the pub games that oddly led to me enjoying reading that section the most, plus it's nice to have a variety of skills utillized in mini games of that nature rather than just relegating it all to a simple Gambling test.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rough Nights and Hard Days
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rough Nights and Hard Days
by Paid a b. y. d. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/27/2019 09:11:54

Wow! I'm SO impressed with Rough Nights & Hard Days.

We're seeing the bigger picture for the new addition of WFRP4 with the release of Rough Nights & Hard Days. This is classic WFRP (Rough Night in The three Feathers), expanded and extended with additional adventures to form a mini campaign. Though they can also be easily played separately.

The production values are superb, with fantastic artwork. I advise anyone to view the PDF full screen, double page spread to truly appreciate the layout and panoramic art pieces.

The adventures are pure quality from the hand of WFRP legend Graeme Davis. Using innovative simultaneous multi-plot hooks to create potential for true farce. Appropriately one of the scenarios is set in a Grand Opera House. They're a challenge and a joy for the GM to run. Whilst having a clear structure to the Multi-plot hooks, there’s plenty of room for improvisation, and its expected. This is farce after all.

I think Rough Nights & Hard Days really helps to show what makes WFRP unique in the pantheon of Fantasy RPG's. It presents an opportunity for characters to explore the Empires high society and the cultured elite, whilst getting into all sorts of trouble. The multi-plot hooks are a genius way to explore this farce.

Finally we have the Gnome renaissance! Gnomes are back as a playable character species. To my delight they've been brilliantly reworked to fit the WFRP world in a much more compelling way. Significantly they are no longer the poorer cousins of dwarfs, they are their own thing. They have more in common with the darker tales of gnomes and small folk from European folk lore. Inherently magical, they have an affinity to the dark colour of magic, and a new talent "Suffuse with Ulgu". These Gnomes are natural illusionists, and very hard to find if they dont want to be found. Three new Gnome gods are presented. The old Gnome god Ringil is there but is now the god of Merriment, Entertainment, and Trickery - The previous smithing aspect has been dropped in the reworking - These are very much WFRP Gnomes, suitably dark, mysterious and magical.

And the final curtain call is "Pub Games". A selection of pub games is provided along with fun rules for each of them. Clearly a lot of work has gone into crafting this section of the book. The Old World is a rich world and these games as well as being fun, really help to bring the Old World alive. I can see a game of "Dwile Flonking" quickly getting out of hand.

This is an exceptional release from Cubicle7. I highly recommend it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rough Nights and Hard Days
by Stuart K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/26/2019 15:04:23

Rough Nights at the Three Feathers was a seminal WFRP 1st Edition one-shot adventure published by Games Workshop in the 80s. This latest reprinting links it to 4 other adventures, by original author Graeme Davis, making a complete set of adventures that can form a mini-campaign (though I'd recommend you space them out with some other adventures and once C7 reprint The Enemy Within that'll be a cinch).

Rough Nights is reprinted here in full colour with glorious artwork making this its prettiest edition. Its sequel Natassia's Wedding is fully expanded out. Lords of Ubersreik is a reprint of the main chapter from 3e's Edge of Night. The rest of Edge of Night you're not missing much - just some very sketchy 3e component wrangling. This time the Lords of Ubersreik/Edge of Night is more integrated into the overall narrative. Two original scenarios - one set in a court and the other at the opera - work on a pretty similar theme.

Essentially each of the scenarios involves a whole host of things happening around the PCs that they must react to. This can be a real challenge to GM but if you like multi-threading subplots this is the collection for you.

There is also an appendix for a new playable race, and for pub games that you can use in any pub-based adventure, or even play for real if you're ambitious.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Doctor Who Roleplaying Game
by Stephen M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/26/2019 08:45:19

This is a fantastic game. The rules perfectly reflect and allow for just the right kind of crazy that is so common in Doctor Who. The action-based initiative system especially is very fun.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Doctor Who Roleplaying Game
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rough Nights and Hard Days
by Ashley R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/26/2019 08:26:19

A complete mini-campaign, full of classic adventures and with some brand new ones updated by the original author to continue the classic story. Throw in a lot of gorgeous art and beautiful maps and what's not to love?

You also get Gnomes which some people (humans) say are actually just skinny halflings in disguise. But halflings can't do magic r-right?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Rough Nights and Hard Days
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruComics.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 658 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates